Here’s this week’s round-up of EdTech-related things we’ve spotted:

Interview with Luis von Ahn, founder of Duolingo

duolingo_300x200Duolingo is one of the biggest free language learning tools out there right now – available as a website and smartphone app. It claims to provide language learning based purely on science and data. Definitely one to keep an eye on. Interestingly, the reason it’s free is that language learning is merely a means to an end – that end being to generate revenue via crowd-sourced translations provided by the people using free language learning tool. Read the interview.

 

And while we’re talking about Duolingo…

Here’s a review of Duolingo and Babbel, from The Economist – if you want to know more about what they are.

 

cheggChegg is going to float on the stock exchange

Textbook rentals a big business? Delivery of digital textbooks the future? Looks like it.

 

Online education is no bubble, according to the Clayton Christensen Institiute

The MOOC backlash is well under way. Here’s one argument that they’re going nowhere, and they are part of the solution to a real problem, and not just a whole load of new problems.

Video gamers are cottoning on to EdTech, now they know it’s worth $7.8bn (apparently)

A report on the recent Games for Change Festival, in New York.

Although the festival was full of wide-eyed optimists, and plenty of save-the-world idealism, the sheer quantity of discussion around game based learning made it clear that the market is also driving social impact game development.

And yet more adaptive learning news…

aleksMcGraw Hill have bought adaptive learning technology provider ALEKS – we hadn’t heard of ALEKS before, so will need to check it out. This is McGraw’s second big adaptive learning acquisition, so it’s clearly central to their strategy.

 

 

Photo credit: Foter.com / Public Domain Mark 1.0

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