Apple’s electric car and the death of language teaching as we know it

Apple’s electric car and the death of language teaching as we know it

When I was four, going on five, a TV show called Knight Rider premiered in the UK. I loved it and remained a fan for most of my childhood (OK, I admit it; I’m still a fan). There was The Hoff, of course  –  all leather jackets, open shirt buttons and swagger  –  but the real star of the show was K.I.T.T  – Knight Industries Two Thousand  –  the ‘advanced, artificially intelligent, self-aware and nearly indestructible car’. Over thirty years later Apple and Google are in a head-to-head race to bring K.I.T.T’s spiritual successor  –  the driverless car  –  to market. And, as a little-known and hard-to-spot side effect, the ramifications for the teaching of languages, especially English, could be huge.

What we’re reading

What we’re reading

This week, we weren’t just reading, we were watching, rubbing our eyes and re-watching. Make it to the end of this week’s packed WWR to see why. Agile design Design company and publishing experts emc design give some insights into how they manage their...
What we’re reading

What we’re reading

We’ve all had our heads in the app clouds this week but there’s always room for an article about Dothraki on our reading list. How to hire a developer We’ve talked about hiring developers if you’re looking to build an app, but we’ve not...
Slated translating keyboard app: reviewed

Slated translating keyboard app: reviewed

This app is both my dream and my nightmare. I love learning languages, and anything that enables me to understand and communicate in more of them is a fantastic tool. On the other hand, if tools like this get too good, my life’s work (as a creator of English language courses and resources) – and my future income – will be wiped out with a few swipes of a touchscreen.